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WordPress 5.0 Tips

A collection of content related to the release of the next generation of WordPress

Gutenberg, REST API, and you…

Daniel Bachhuber, a core contributor for a number of years, has just this Call to Action on the WordPress Core blog:

As you may know, Gutenberg uses the WordPress REST API as a bridge between the land of JavaScript and land of PHP. There were a whole host of conceptual challenges in translating WordPress internals to REST — and even more we still haven’t solved!

The post also linked to the GitHub Milestone for ‘REST API’ in the Gutenberg editor where a number of development tasks are open for discussion and assignment.

Best Practices for Blocks and Themes in the new editor

This post by Jason Yingling look in detail the best practices for developing new blocks in the new WordPress editor and how to integrate these features into features into WordPress themes.

One interesting part of this tutorial focuses on where to put your new blocks, in your theme OR in a plugin:

The general rule of thumb for including functionality in plugins or themes is to keep themes to the presentation of content and use plugins for functionality.

Blocks fall under this same set of principles. And I fall into the camp that blocks should be included in plugins as they extend the functionality of WordPress.

Read the full thing here.

Beginner’s Gutenberg Development Tips

The team over at meks have done a great job of pulling together 31 beginner’s tips on Gutenberg Development.

From the post:

Both from developers and content side, this improvement will change the way we code and produce content in WordPress. Not to mention all the advantages that are coming with the blocks and the ways we create content.

 

The WordPress Roadmap, still a long way to go…

The WordPress Roadmap is a great tool to look back at previous WordPress releases and get a good idea about what’s coming up.

WordPress version 5.0 will be included in this roadmap soon enough and at some point get ‘frozen’ and made ready for release:

The month prior to a release new features are frozen and the focus is entirely on ensuring the quality of the release by eliminating bugs and profiling the code for any performance issues.

As you can see, WordPress 5.0 still has a long way to go before it’s ready to be released – the current version is 4.9.6 which has (obviously) some links to version 5’s new Gutenberg editor:

4.9.6 will likely be a quicker release cycle. Some initial targets were discussed for this release.

  • The “Try Gutenberg” prompt
  • GDPR related items
  • Any changes resulting from several discussions currently happening about needed API changes to prepare for Gutenberg.

Block-voluton

Moving to a ‘Block-based’ editing system was first outlined in the ‘How Little Blocks Work‘ announcement post in May 2017. This was an opportunity to look at a brand new way to store content data in WordPress:

The new block-based development logic was outlined by Matias Ventura as:

Blocks provide functions that describe how they want to be represented for both the editing context and the final markup to be saved. The internal representation of the post content is updated as blocks are updated, so during the editing session we can remain in the right side of the diagram above.

Further information can be found in the ‘Editor Technical Overview‘ which is where the idea of using ‘HTML comments’ as a way to separate block content started out.

Read the WordPress 5.0 Development Cycle

The source for all technical project information can be found over on the Make WordPress Core site. This includes the Release Schedule, notes from regular meetings. There is also a direct link to the 5.0 Post Tag which will grow as more information is published.